The dangers of driving (or doing anything else) while black

An examination of traffic stops and arrests in Greensboro, N.C., and other cities uncovered wide racial differences in measure after measure of police conduct.

More and more, the evidence proves what we’ve long known: that if you’re black you aren’t safe nor will you get a fair shake when the cops are around. The presence of a police officer increases your risk of death or injury.

[A]n analysis by The New York Times of tens of thousands of traffic stops and years of arrest data in this racially mixed city of 280,000 uncovered wide racial differences in measure after measure of police conduct.

Those same disparities were found across North Carolina, the state that collects the most detailed data on traffic stops. And at least some of them showed up in the six other states that collect comprehensive traffic-stop statistics.

Here in North Carolina’s third-largest city, officers pulled over African-American drivers for traffic violations at a rate far out of proportion with their share of the local driving population. They used their discretion to search black drivers or their cars more than twice as often as white motorists — even though they found drugs and weapons significantly more often when the driver was white.

Officers were more likely to stop black drivers for no discernible reason. And they were more likely to use force if the driver was black, even when they did not encounter physical resistance.

Source: The Disproportionate Risks of Driving While Black – The New York Times

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